A lifetime experience wherever you are

Smart technology is changing the game for major sports events

By Claire Marchand

Long gone are the days when you had to be home and in front of your television to watch major sports events such as the Olympics or a football championship. Today you have access to broadcast on your computer, tablet or smartphone, and you can even experience virtual reality (VR).

VR camera set up to capture the action during a European football match (Photo: Sportscaster)
VR camera set up to capture the action during a European football match (Photo: Sportscaster)

Live, replay, 3D or VR?

2016 is a great year for sports fans around the world. In June and July the 2016 Euro championship in France will draw football aficionados from all over Europe to French stadiums. Those who cannot make the journey will still be able to enjoy every game wherever they are; at home on their smart TV set, on the go thanks to their mobile devices. They will have the opportunity to view game in replay if they cannot experience it live, or have highlights provided by video publishing channels such as YouTube. 

The same goes for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. The hundreds of events scheduled for two weeks in August will be viewed by millions around the world. 

Utmost security

Providing state-of-the-art broadcasting is not the only concern. One of the main challenges is the security for athletes, officials and the general public for the duration of these events. Heightened security measures have to be put in place to ensure safe access to all venues and to deter criminal or terrorists plans. Security today relies mostly on electronic access control and surveillance systems. 

Sensing it all

None of this would be possible without sensors. Smart broadcasting and viewing, access control and video monitoring systems rely heavily on a great number of electronic components such as sensors, semiconductors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), organic LEDs (OLEDs), microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Whatever the size and type of component, their quality is of the utmost importance to ensure flawless broadcasts and reliable access control. 

Testing and certifying component quality

Electronic component manufacturers and suppliers have a very powerful tool at their disposal to ensure that their products are safe, reliable and meet the strictest requirements: IECQ, the IEC Quality Assessment System for Electronic Components, testing and certification. 

As a worldwide approval and certification system covering the supply of electronic components, assemblies and associated materials and processes, IECQ tests and certifies components using quality assessment specifications based on IEC International Standards. 

A multitude of components

The numerous types of electronic component covered by IECQ are used in all kinds of technologies, from the smallest device to the most complex piece of equipment.

Components covered by IECQ include: 

  • active components, including integrated circuits
  • electromagnetic components
  • electromechanical components
  • electro-optic components
  • hybrid integrated circuits
  • passive components
  • printed boards
  • wires and cables
  • distributors 

In addition, there is a multitude of related materials and processes that are covered by the IECQ Schemes. IECQ certificates are used worldwide as a tool to monitor and control the manufacturing supply chain, thus helping to reduce costs and time to market, and eliminating the need for multiple re-assessments of suppliers. 

IECQ operates industry specific Certification Schemes:

  • IECQ AP (Approved Process)
  •    IECQ AP-CAP (Counterfeit Avoidance Programme)
  • IECQ AC (Approved Component)
  •    IECQ AC-TC (Technology Certification)
  •    IECQ AC-AQP (Automotive Qualification Programme)
  •    IECQ Scheme for LED Lighting (LED components, assemblies and systems)
  • IECQ Avionics
  • IECQ HSPM (Hazardous Substances Process Management)
  • IECQ ITL (Independent Testing Laboratory) 

While most of these Schemes have been in place for many years and are widely used by electronic component manufacturers and suppliers, IECQ AC-AQP and the IECQ Scheme for LED Lighting, both under the umbrella of the IECQ Approved Component Scheme, are more recent but very promising and well received by industry players throughout the world.

More information: www.iecq.org

Gallery
Ticket scanning system at Audi Dome in Munich, Germany VR camera set up to capture the action during a European football match (Photo: Sportscaster)
IP-based facility monitoring system, comprising 290 cameras, access control and video intercom system, installed at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, USA Ticket scanning system in the Audi Dome Stadium that hosts the Bayern Munch basketball club (Photo: Riegel/Deca Card Engineering)
VR cameras capture action during football game IP-based facility monitoring system, comprising 290 cameras, access control and video intercom system, installed at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, USA (Photo: Modern Fire and Security Systems, Inc.)