piezoelectric rss sort by issue

Issue 04/2018

Planes, trains and automobiles

The future of transport – from flying cars to electric trucks

New technologies will revolutionize the way we commute and transport goods over short and long distances, helped by a plethora of IEC International Standards.

Issue 02/2018

Harvesting energy from roads

New technologies capture ambient energy and convert it to electric power

Imagine using the millions of kilometres of paved roads around the world to harvest energy. Apart from the initial investment costs required for equipment and installation, this energy source is free to produce and has no adverse effect on the environment. Instead, it uses sunlight or the mechanical vibrations produced by vehicles to generate electrical energy.

2017
Issue 06/2017

Energy efficiency to recover power for the future

IEC work helps tap the biggest pool of available energy

Energy efficiency (EE) is the most important and easily available source of energy; it can be collected along the entire energy chain, from generation, transmission and storage to final use in industry, homes or transportation. IEC standardization and conformity assessment (CA) work are central to electrical EE at all levels. 

Issue 05/2017

Self-powering the internet of things

Harnessing ambient energy sources is critical to the rollout of the internet of things in industry

The rapidly growing number of connected devices that form the backbone of the internet of things must become self-powered. The US research and advisory company Gartner, Inc. forecasts that 8,4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide in 2017, up 31% from 2016, and will reach 20,4 billion by 2020. Powering these with batteries or by connecting them to power networks would be totally impractical, even impossible.

2015
Issue 05/2015

Non-stop energy harvesting

Energy harvesting is developing fast, supporting innumerable applications and devices

There is a rapidly increasing range of applications using energy harvesting (EH), the process of collecting low-grade energy from sources such as ambient or waste heat, solar, thermal and kinetic energy and converting it into electrical energy. The increase is driven by the need to enable an ever expanding range of sensors to run and communicate independent of an external power source and by the need to meet the power requirements of a wide variety of mobile and wearable devices. It is seen as one of the main techniques that will allow the Internet of Things (IoT) to develop.